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Two Sigma Announces Public Launch of Halite, A.i. Coding Game


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Introducing Halite.

Halite is a programming game in which players code bots to compete to overtake a virtual grid.

Credit: Cornell Tech

Two Sigma, in partnership with Cornell Tech, today announced the public launch of Halite, a programming game in which players code bots that compete head-to-head to overtake a virtual grid. Halite provides a fun way to learn and apply AI, machine learning, and other advanced algorithms in a collaborative, competitive game setting by writing smart bots. Designed for coding enthusiasts of all levels of experience, Halite creates an engaging game environment to learn, write, and visualize your code in action. Users can track their own bots as well as their competitors’ progress—either globally or within private groups at a company, school, or club—by viewing a real-time leaderboard. The game will be released for a three-month competition, and the success of each bot will be correlated with the creativity and sophistication of its code.

The game was initially developed within Two Sigma by two summer interns as a four-week internal competition to promote creativity and healthy competition amongst the company’s engineers. “At Two Sigma, we’re focused on bringing creativity to all that we do. We realized that two of our summer interns had achieved something special when we had the entire company uploading bots into this game. It goes to show that you never know where innovation will come from,” said Matt Adereth, a senior engineer at Two Sigma .

Cornell Tech will facilitate Halite’s public launch and provide ongoing game support and community management, empowering players to get better, learn and have fun. “Like chess, Halite’s rules are simple to understand but challenging to master, providing an element of continuous learning that we believe will resonate well with the developer community,” said Arnaud Sahuguet, head of the Foundry at Cornell Tech, which focuses on productizing ideas and academic research.

 

From Cornell Tech
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