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Wesley A. Clark, Made Computing Personal, Dies at 88


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Wesley Clark in 1962, demonstrating the first Laboratory Instrument Computer (LINC).

Wesley A. Clark, a physicist who designed the first modern personal computer, died Feb. 22 at the age of 88.

Credit: MIT Lincoln Laboratory

Wesley A. Clark, a physicist who designed the first modern personal computer, died Feb. 22 at his home in Brooklyn. He was 88.

The cause was severe atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, according to his wife, Maxine Rockoff.

Mr. Clark’s computer designs built a bridge from the era of mainframe systems, which were inaccessible to the general public and were programmed with stacks of punch cards, to personal computers that respond interactively to a user.

He achieved his breakthroughs working with a small group of scientists and engineers at the Lincoln Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the late 1950s and early ’60s. Early on they had the insight that the cost of computing would fall inexorably and lead to computers that were then unimaginable.

 

From The New York Times
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