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Growth in Computer Science Driven By Student Interest, Societal Need


omputer science students collaborate in Princeton's Friend Center teaching lab.

In response to growing enrollment and increasing interest from other disciplines, Princeton University is expanding its computer science faculty by more than 30%.

Credit: Bentley Drezner

In response to growing enrollment and increasing interest in computer science from other disciplines, Princeton University is expanding its computer science faculty by more than 30 percent.

The expansion will add 10 tenure-track positions to the current 28, making the computer science department one of the three largest concentrations at Princeton. The department plans to bring in the new faculty members as soon as possible, and the university will support the expansion with funds in the long term.

"Computer science brims with intellectual excitement, offering new insights into age-old questions and novel ways to solve major societal challenges," says Princeton president Christopher L. Eisgruber.

Computer scientists at Princeton regularly connect with a range of collaborators across campus, and enrollments in computer science have tripled since the department was launched in 1985. In addition, among students on track to graduate in 2017, 35% of Princeton computer science majors are women, nearly twice the national average of 18%.

The introductory computer science course, called General Computer Science and started 20 years ago by Princeton professor Robert Sedgewick, is the university's most popular class. Sedgewick created the course because he believed there were core principles of computer science that could be taught to a general group of students.

From Princeton Engineering News
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