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­.s. Official: Chinese Want Nsa Cyber Schools


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Cybersecurity analysts work in the "watch and warning center" of the U.S. governments cyber defense lab in Idaho Falls, ID.

Corporate leaders in China want universities in that country to model courses on curricula approved by the U.S. National Security Agency.

Credit: Mark J. Terrill/AP

Corporate leaders in China believe relations between the United States and China in cyberspace could improve if Chinese universities were to model courses on U.S. National Security Agency (NSA)-approved curricula, according to the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education's Ernest McDuffie.

His recent visit to Beijing involved meeting with Chinese businesspeople who voiced support for the U.S. government-created training courses. They were enthusiastic about having an opportunity to "help raise that level of ethical consideration across the board," McDuffie says.

However, the proposal to share cybersecurity training comes at a time when both countries have accused each other of hacking into trade secrets.

Under the National Centers of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance program, more than 180 U.S. public and private universities have aligned their curricula with NSA standards for faculty, training, and facilities. The initiative was launched in 1998, and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) joined it in 2004.

McDuffie says about 60 schools in China have expressed interest in adopting the NSA-DHC Centers of Academic Excellence cyber model. The U.S. program includes sections focused on information protection, research and development, and cyberoperations, which includes cyberspying and offensive hacking.

However, McDuffie says the cyberoperations coursework that contains classified information would not be shared with the Chinese counterparts.

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Abstracts Copyright © 2014 Information Inc., Bethesda, Maryland, USA


 

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