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Making a Layer Cake With Atomic Precision


Graphene

The Manchester researchers used individual one-atom-thick crystals to develop a multilayer cake that works like a nanoscale electric transformer.

Credit: University of Manchester

University of Manchester researchers have shown that graphene and other one-atom-thick crystals could be used in a wide range of new materials and electronic devices by stacking individual atomic layers on top of each other.

The researchers used individual one-atom-thick crystals to develop a multilayer cake that works like a nanoscale electric transformer. The researchers say the structures could lead to new types of electronic and photonic devices that no existing materials could make, including novel architectures for transistors and detectors. The researchers used graphene as a one-atom-thick conductive plane while four atomic layers of boron nitride served as an electrical insulator.

"There is a whole library of atomically-thin materials," says Manchester professor Andre Geim. "By combining them, it is possible to create principally new materials that don’t exist in nature. This avenue promises to become even more exciting than graphene itself."

From University of Manchester
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Abstracts Copyright © 2012 Information Inc., Bethesda, Maryland, USA 


 

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