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Communications of the ACM

Communications of the ACM

Self-plagiarism in computer science


We are all too aware of the ravages of misconduct in the academic community. Students submit assignments inherited from their friends, online papermills provide term papers on popular topics, and occasionally researchers are found falsifying data or publishing the work of others as their own.This article examines a lesser-known but potentially no less bothersome form of scientific misconduct, namely self-plagiarism. Self-plagiarism occurs when authors reuse portions of their previous writings in subsequent research papers. Occasionally, the derived paper is simply a retitled and reformatted version of the original one, but more frequently it is assembled from bits and pieces of previous work.

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