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Communications of the ACM

Table of Contents


The external auditor's review of computer controls

The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of 1977, coupled with growing demands for corporate accountability, have forced both auditors and computer administrators to evaluate computer based controls. Computer administrators can benefit …

Another spelling correction program

We read James L. Peterson's article, “Computer Programs for Detecting and Correcting Spelling Errors” with great interest. We too have recently developed a spelling correction program as part of a tutorial on programming techniques …

Experience with a space efficient way to store a dictionary

The paper, “Computer Programs for Detecting and Correcting Spelling Errors” by James L. Peterson [3], listed methods for checking and correcting spelling errors. One significant method, however, was not included: a probabilistic …

Updating a master file—yet one more time

For several years I have been teaching a file updating algorithm which is essentially the same as that in Dwyer's admirable paper [1]. There is one unjustified objection to the algorithm that perceptive students and people with …

The cube-connected cycles: a versatile network for parallel computation

An interconnection pattern of processing elements, the cube-connected cycles (CCC), is introduced which can be used as a general purpose parallel processor. Because its design complies with present technological constraints,  …

Strip trees: a hierarchical representation for curves

The use of curves to represent two-dimensional structures is an important part of many scientific investigations. For example, geographers use curves extensively to represent map features such as contour lines, roads, and rivers …

Technical correspondence: on Peterson's spelling error detector. author's reply


Technical correspondence: on Cichelli's algorithm for finding minimal perfect hash functions


Technical correspondence: on Peterson's spelling error detector


ACM's 1981 computer science conference attracts 2000 to St. Louis


ACM forum