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Communications of the ACM


121 - 130 of 371 for bentley


Acceptance of post-adoption unanticipated is usage: towards a taxonomy

Information Systems (IS), as social artifacts, are open to interpretation during use. This flexibility creates opportunities for individuals to use systems in unanticipated ways to better fit particular tasks. Yet such unanticipated usage is counter to the use of IS as vehicles for managerial control and ensuring consistency in transaction processing across organizations. To effectively manage this tension a structured appreciation of post-adoption IS usage in its social context is required. Through a case study of users in a large Australian accommodation chain we develop a taxonomy of system usage, exploring unanticipated usage to meet workplace demands, its underlying motivations, implications for transaction processing consistency and ultimately operational and/or managerial decision making.

2012-08-20
https://dl.acm.org/ft_gateway.cfm?id=2351850&dwn=1

Efficient relaxed search in hierarchically clustered sequence datasets

This article presents a new algorithm for finding oligonucleotide signatures that are specific and sensitive for organisms or groups of organisms in large-scale sequence datasets. We assume that the organisms have been organized in a hierarchy, for example, a phylogenetic tree. The resulting signatures, binding sites for primers and probes, match the maximum possible number of organisms in the target group while having at most k matches outside of the target group.

The key step in the algorithm is the use of the lowest common ancestor (LCA) to search the organism hierarchy; this allows the combinatorial problem in almost linear time (empirically observed) to be solved. The presented algorithm improves performance by several orders of magnitude in terms of both memory consumption and runtime when compared to the best-known previous algorithms while giving identical, exact solutions.

This article gives a formal description of the algorithm, discusses details of our concrete, publicly available implementation, and presents the results from our performance evaluation.

2012-07-19
https://dl.acm.org/ft_gateway.cfm?id=2212315&dwn=1

How to be a successful app developer: lessons from the simulation of an app ecosystem

App developers are constantly competing against each other to win more downloads for their apps. With hundreds of thousands of apps in these online stores, what strategy should a developer use to be successful? Should they innovate, make many similar apps, optimise their own apps or just copy the apps of others? Looking more deeply, how does a complex app ecosystem perform when developers choose to use different strategies? This paper investigates these questions using AppEco, the first Artificial Life model of mobile application ecosystems. In AppEco, developer agents build and upload apps to the app store; user agents browse the store and download the apps. A distinguishing feature of AppEco is the explicit modelling of apps as artefacts. In this work we use AppEco to simulate Apple's iOS app ecosystem and investigate common developer strategies, evaluating them in terms of downloads received, app diversity, and adoption rate.

2012-07-07
https://dl.acm.org/ft_gateway.cfm?id=2330182&dwn=1

How to be a successful app developer: lessons from the simulation of an app ecosystem

App developers are constantly competing against each other to win more downloads for their apps. With hundreds of thousands of apps in these online stores, what strategy should a developer use to be successful? Should they innovate, make many similar apps, optimise their own apps or just copy the apps of others? Looking more deeply, how does a complex app ecosystem perform when developers choose to use different strategies? This paper investigates these questions using AppEco, the first Artificial Life model of mobile application ecosystems. In AppEco, developer agents build and upload apps to the app store; user agents browse the store and download the apps. A distinguishing feature of AppEco is the explicit modelling of apps as artefacts. In this work we use AppEco to simulate Apple's iOS app ecosystem and investigate common developer strategies, evaluating them in terms of downloads received, app diversity, and adoption rate.

2012-07-01
https://dl.acm.org/ft_gateway.cfm?id=2384698&dwn=1

Practical Problem-Based Learning in Computing Education

Computer Science (CS) is a relatively new disciple and how best to introduce it to new students remains an open question. Likewise, the identification of appropriate instructional strategies for the diverse topics that constitute the average curriculum remains open to debate. One approach considered by a number of practitioners in CS education involves Problem-Based Learning (PBL), a radical departure from the conventional lecturing format. PBL has been adopted in other domains with success, but whether these positive experiences will be replicated in CS remains to be seen. In this article, a systematic review of PBL initiatives in undergraduate and postgraduate CS is presented from a Computing Education Research (CER) perspective. This includes analyses of a range of practical didactic issues, including the degree to which PBL has been systematically evaluated, practical problem description in the literature, as well as a survey of topics for which a PBL approach has been adopted.

2012-07-01
https://dl.acm.org/ft_gateway.cfm?id=2275599&dwn=1

Active aging in community centers and ICT design implications

In recent years, the wellness of seniors has become more important than ever before in our rapidly aging society. In the U. S., approximately 11,000 community senior centers provide a broad spectrum of programs for seniors to improve their overall health and wellness in their community. Although numerous studies have reported on the various benefits of participation in such programs, little is known about how information and communications technology (ICT) can support seniors' participation in this practice. We describe findings from a two-phase qualitative study using semi-structured interviews, site visits, and focus groups with seniors and staff of senior centers located in urban and suburban areas of Chicago, IL and Tampa, FL. Based on the results, we discuss design implications for technologies that could facilitate seniors' engagement with their local community including senior centers.

2012-06-11
https://dl.acm.org/ft_gateway.cfm?id=2317981&dwn=1

StoryPlace.Me: the path from studying elder communication to a public location-based video service

We describe our research path that took us from studying communication needs across distance and generations, to a small-scale study of a person-to-person location-based video service, and finally to a public beta of StoryPlace.me which extends this service to support public video sharing and historical content. The process was not a clear, linear design path, but one of an unexpected change in focus that resulted in the current service which goes beyond the original vision of tools for inter-generational communication. We will describe our research methods as well as key findings from each step of our journey and conclude with implications for similar product concept generation activities.

2012-05-05
https://dl.acm.org/ft_gateway.cfm?id=2212851&dwn=1

Music interaction research in HCI: let's get the band back together

The ubiquity of music consumption is overarching. Statistics for digital music sales, streaming video videos, computer games, and illegal sharing all speak of a huge interest. At the same, an incredible amount of data about every day interactions (sales and use) with music is accumulating through new cloud services. However, there is an amazing lack of public knowledge about everyday music interaction. This panel discusses the state of music interaction as a part of digital media research. We consider why music interaction research has become so marginal in HCI and discuss how to revive it. Our two discussion themes are: orientation towards design vs. research in music related R&D, and the question if and how private, big data on music interactions could enlighten our understanding of ubiquitous media culture.

2012-05-05
https://dl.acm.org/ft_gateway.cfm?id=2212401&dwn=1

synchronous MediaSharing: social and communal media consumption for geographically dispersed users

Real-time social interaction possibilities are increasingly disappearing from the media consumption process. A decisive contributing factor to this tendency is growing user location disparity. This paper proposes synchronous MediaSharing (sMS), a distributed, purely web-based framework consisting of APIs plus a back-end that enables geographically separated persons to socially consume multimedia content in a synchronized fashion. The sMS service currently resides in a proof-of-concept stage, awaiting qualitative evaluation by means of user experience research methods, yet its underlying network infrastructure as well as the majority of its principal functional components have already been designed, implemented and evaluated. A chief innovation of the system is that its exclusive reliance on open web standards warrants cross-platform support and unlocks seamless content synchronization across the physical and virtual worlds. We outline our vision for the sMS service, motivate the need for such a system, discuss its current implementation, present tentative practical results that confirm the feasibility and validity of our design, and overview the sMS feature roadmap. The sMS functionality has apparent utility in education, training and professional settings, but also in the field of entertainment and the recreational market.

2012-02-22
https://dl.acm.org/ft_gateway.cfm?id=2155574&dwn=1

From the small to the large: learnings from the deployment of serendipitous family stories / storyplace.me

Research in the large is quite different from the more traditional small-scale field studies conducted in Ubicomp over the past decade. Large scale studies are not just small scale ones with a larger n, they allow researchers to answer fundamentally different questions about use and adoption and enable the studying of systems in real and messy social networks and situations. However, conducting large-scale research often requires large-scale resources. We present the evolution of the Serendipitous Family Stories system into StoryPlace.me and discuss how large-scale research required 5x more time and effort to prepare a system for a field trial.

2011-09-18
https://dl.acm.org/ft_gateway.cfm?id=2025533&dwn=1