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The news archive provides access to past news stories from Communications of the ACM and other sources by date.

June 2012


From ACM News

Your E-Book Is Reading You

Your E-Book Is Reading You

It takes the average reader just seven hours to read the final book in Suzanne Collins's "Hunger Games" trilogy on the Kobo e-reader—about 57 pages an hour.


From ACM News

Researchers Use Spoofing to 'Hack' Into a Flying Drone

Researchers Use Spoofing to 'Hack' Into a Flying Drone

American researchers took control of a flying drone by hacking into its GPS system—acting on a $1,000 (£640) dare from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.


From ACM News

A Robot Takes Stock

A Robot Takes Stock

The short figure creeping around the Carnegie Mellon University campus store in a hooded sweatshirt recently isn't some shoplifter, but a robot taking inventory.


From ACM TechNews

Communication Scheme Makes Popular Applications 'Gracefully Mobile'

Communication Scheme Makes Popular Applications 'Gracefully Mobile'

MIT researchers have developed the mobile shell remote-login program, which addresses the lack of mobility of the popular SSH program.  


From ACM TechNews

Interactive Map Like GPS for Roman Empire

Interactive Map Like GPS for Roman Empire

Stanford University researchers have developed an interactive map of the Roman Empire called ORBIS that features roads, rivers, and sea routes.  


From ACM TechNews

Super Wi-Fi Network Eyed for Rural College Towns

Super Wi-Fi Network Eyed for Rural College Towns

AIR.U, a consortium of higher education associations, public interest groups, and technology companies, has launched an effort to bring more super Wi-Fi broadband service to university towns in rural areas.  


From ACM TechNews

Period of Transition: Stanford Computer Science Rethinks Core Curriculum

Period of Transition: Stanford Computer Science Rethinks Core Curriculum

Stanford University's computer science faculty embarked on an initiative to reinvent its core curriculum about five years ago.  


From ACM TechNews

Europeans Develop Open Source Software for Biosciences

Europeans Develop Open Source Software for Biosciences

Life sciences researchers for the first time will be able to examine the spread of cancer cells in a three-dimensional environment and determine how effectively viruses and targeted drugs enter cells.  


From ACM News

A Look Inside Leap Motion, the 3D Gesture Control That's Like Kinect on Steroids

Leap Motion's not the household name Kinect is, but it should be; the company's motion-tracking system is more powerful, more accurate, smaller, cheaper, and just more impressive.


From ACM News

Official: West Concerned about Iranian, Islamic Video Games Production

Official: West Concerned about Iranian, Islamic Video Games Production

Production of computer and video games with Iranian and Islamic contents has become a source of concern for the western states, a senior Iranian cultural official said Sunday.

 


From ACM News

'Leap Second' Lengthens Weekend

'Leap Second' Lengthens Weekend

The world is about to get a well-earned long weekend but don't make big plans because it will only last an extra second. A so-called "leap second" will be added to the world's atomic clocks as they undergo a rare adjustment to…


From ACM News

Minitel: The Rise and Fall of the France-Wide Web

Minitel: The Rise and Fall of the France-Wide Web

Many years ago, long before the birth of the Web, there was a time when France was the happening-est place in the digital universe.


From ACM News

How Google Is Teaching Computers to See

How Google Is Teaching Computers to See

Google is attempting to teach computers to recognize human faces without telling the computing algorithms which faces are human.


From ACM TechNews

Penn Researchers

Penn Researchers

University of Pennsylvania researchers have developed a method for creating phase change materials, which could lead to more efficient and faster memory storage devices.  


From ACM TechNews

Computer Scientists Break Security Token Key in Record Time

Computer Scientists Break Security Token Key in Record Time

A group of computer scientists dubbed Team Prosecco says it has found a way to extract a security key from a widely used RSA electronic token in 13 minutes.  


From ACM TechNews

Design Reduces Nanowire Transistor Footprint

Design Reduces Nanowire Transistor Footprint

A*STAR Institute of Microelectronics researchers have integrated two transistors onto a single vertical silicon nanowire, which they say could further push the areal density limit of nanowire transistors.  


From ACM TechNews

Building an Army of Ones and Zeros and the Troops Who Know How to Wield Them

Building an Army of Ones and Zeros and the Troops Who Know How to Wield Them

Intrinsic to the U.S. Pentagon's development of cyberarsenals is the challenge of staffing the Cyber Command.  


From ACM TechNews

What if There Were No More Disasters?

What if There Were No More Disasters?

Texas A&M University professor Robin Murphy recently released "Computing for Disasters: A Report from the Community Workshop," which details the role of computing in disaster management, including preparedness, prevention, response…


From ACM News

Voice Algorithms Spot Parkinson's Disease

Voice Algorithms Spot Parkinson's Disease

Parkinson's is a devastating disease for those living with the condition, and currently there is no cure. Diagnosis can also be slow, as there are no blood tests to detect it.


From ACM News

It's Not an Entertainment Gadget, It's Google's Bid to Control the Future

It's Not an Entertainment Gadget, It's Google's Bid to Control the Future

Joe Britt hands me his latest creation, a black ball with glittering LED lights around the middle, and implores me to examine it.


From ACM News

Blade Runner: Which Predictions Have Come True?

Blade Runner: Which Predictions Have Come True?

Based on Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K Dick, Ridley Scott's Blade Runner—the tale of a hunt for four dangerous "replicant" humans—is a classic envisioning of a dystopian future, set in 2019 Los Angeles.


From ACM TechNews

You Are Where You E-Mail: Global Migration Trends Discovered in Email Data

You Are Where You E-Mail: Global Migration Trends Discovered in Email Data

Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research and Yahoo! Research recently completed a large migration database based on the global flow of millions of emails.  


From ACM TechNews

Graph500 Adds New Measurement of Supercomputing Performance

Graph500 Adds New Measurement of Supercomputing Performance

The Graph500 executive committee recently announced new specifications for a more representative way to rate large-scale data analytics in high-performance computing. 


From ACM TechNews

Computer Science Tackles 30-Year-Old Economics Problem

Computer Science Tackles 30-Year-Old Economics Problem

MIT researchers have developed an algorithm for finding an almost perfect approximation of the optimal design of a multi-item auction.  


From ACM TechNews

Bot With Boyish Personality Wins Biggest Turing Test

Bot With Boyish Personality Wins Biggest Turing Test

The chatbot Eugene Goostman fooled Turing test judges 29 percent of the time into thinking it was human to take first place in the recent contest in the United Kingdom.  


From ACM TechNews

An Online Encyclopedia That Writes Itself

An Online Encyclopedia That Writes Itself

DARPA recently collaborated with Raytheon BBN researchers to develop a system that can follow global news events and provide intelligence analysts with useful summaries in close to real time.  


From ACM Opinion

You Will Want Google Goggles

You Will Want Google Goggles

At first glance, Thad Starner does not look out of place at Google. A pioneering researcher in the field of wearable computing, Starner is a big, charming man with unruly hair. But everyone who meets him does a double take, because…


From ACM News

How Many Computers to Identify a Cat? 16,000

How Many Computers to Identify a Cat? 16,000

Inside Google’s secretive X laboratory, known for inventing self-driving cars and augmented reality glasses, a small group of researchers began working several years ago on a simulation of the human brain.


From ACM Opinion

The Man Who Keeps Facebook Humming

The Man Who Keeps Facebook Humming

Jay Parikh is happy to never get a call from Mark Zuckerberg. Why? It means he's doing his job well. As the vice president of infrastructure engineering at Facebook, Parikh is charged with the enormous task of keeping the machines…


From ACM TechNews

The Lolo Jones Project, Combining Speed and Technology

The Lolo Jones Project, Combining Speed and Technology

Researchers at Louisiana State University and Red Bull are working on Project X, which involves using computer-vision technology and high-speed motion-capture cameras to analyze athletes' movements to improve their performance…

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